FEBS Bird Acclimation Process

FEBS HAS A WELL-PRACTICED AND SUCCESSFUL ACCLIMATION PROCESS AFTER A PARROT IS RELINQUISHED TO US. THERE ARE NUMEROUS FACTORS TO CONSIDER DURING THE ACCLIMATION PROCESS, SUCH AS THE BIRDS PERSONALITY, IF THE BIRD WAS PREVIOUSLY FLIGHTED AND THE BIRDS FEATHER CONDITION.

Upon arriving at the sanctuary, each bird has a preliminary vet exam as part of the FEBS Flock Safety Guidelines, and then enters a 3-step acclimation process.

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Step 1

At entry a new bird is housed in one of 3 quarantine areas. Ideally we prefer to keep the new bird in the enclosure provided by the owner where they have the familiarity of toys, and perches. We utilize the existing diet to gradually move over to the sanctuary diet. During the  acclimation period, we observe the bird, its preferences, behaviors, and disposition. In addition we use this time to work on adjusting birds with regard to temperature.

Step 2

Once the bird is showing signs of acclimating they will be moved into one of the sanctuary’s outdoor spaces. The location of this next step depends on the state of the bird and its comfort level, as well as temperatures, and any other bird-specific issues. At this point we strive to introduce the bird their own species—and typically next to a bird of the opposite sex. By this step we will have migrated the bird to the enriched FEBS. As in stage one, we closely monitor each bird for any issues.

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Step 3

In this final stage, we introduce several of our new birds together into “like species” flights. This important step ensures that an individual bird won’t experience “newbie syndrome”, e.g. be the lowest in the pecking order of a flock. We continue to monitor the new birds to make sure they are accepted by their new flock and are eating and drinking well. If we see any issues, such as a bird is being picked on by other birds, we remove them from the flock and re-assess them for suitable housing. As with any kind of introduction we are unable to guarantee that this step will be successful. We take many steps to set the birds up for success in these later steps, however, animal behavior can win out. Issues in this stage may cause delays in entry to the large free flights, or in some cases, the need for a smaller aviary. In the cases of unsuccessful initial introduction more attempts will be made. It is extremely important to note that the safety of the animals in our care is paramount. Moves that may endanger current or new parrots may take a longer timeframe. It is also important to note that these steps are a template and not a guarantee.